Medial Epicondylitis

What is Medial Epicondylitis?

Also known as ‘Golfer’s Elbow’, medial epicondylitis is a type of elbow tendinitis, which is similar to the Tennis Elbow. However, the main difference is that this condition usually develops from harm caused to tendons on the inside of the elbow, while the ‘tennis elbow’ is caused by damaged caused to the tendons on the outside. Despite the name, this condition doesn’t only affect golfers, and any repetitive forearm, hand, or wrist motions can lead to microscopic tears on the inside tendons of your elbow.

What are the Symptoms of Medical Epicondylitis?

The symptoms of medical epicondylitis include tenderness and pain on the inner side of your elbow. The pain may also sometimes extend to the inner side of your forearm or lower arm and is likely to worsen with certain movements.

What are the Causes of Medial Epicondylitis?

The symptoms of medical epicondylitis include tenderness and pain on the inner side of your elbow. The pain may also sometimes extend to the inner side of your forearm or lower arm and is likely to worsen with certain movements.

 

Other symptoms of golfer’s elbow include numbness or tingling sensations in the ring and little fingers, weakness in wrists and hands, stiffness in elbows. The pain might worsen if you flex your wrists, life weights, turn a doorknob, or make a fast.

What are the Treatment Options available for Medial Epicondylitis?

  • Applying ice packs to your elbow three to four times a day for about 15 to 20 minutes to reduce pain and swelling.
  • Taking over-the-counter pain relievers like Tylenol, Aleve, Advil, Motrin IB, and others.
  • Using elbow straps or counter-force braces to reduce strain at the medial epicondyle and prevent further damage.
  • Performing exercises for tendon/muscle reconditioning starting with gradual strengthening and stretching of flexor-pronator muscles.
  • Injections that may entail cortisone or possibly a regenerative medicine treatment such as PRP therapy or a stem cell procedure.
  • If all else, fails, doctors may suggest treatment via surgery. Epicondylar debridement may be performed to decompress the ulnar nerve surgically.